True disk cloning software that runs under Windows 10


#1

For years I have used Macrium Reflects running under Windows 7 for cloning my C: drive to be used as a backup. This always worked fine. I just installed Macrium Reflects on my Windows 10 system and it is not behaving well. Does anyone know of a good true cloning software package that runs under Windows 10?


#2

Macrium Reflect works great on Windows 10. Exactly what problem(s) are you experiencing?

Why are you cloning instead of doing simply a system image backup?


#3

I will answer your second question first. If i do a clone and my C drive totally fails I just change my boot drive to the cloned drive and I am in business. This happened to me once a few year ago and it worked fine.
Now the second question. When I run Macrium Reflect under Windows 7 it clones my C drive to my D drive and the new D drive shows only one drive letter. When I cloned my C drive to my D drive under Windows 10 it assigned a Recovery D drive and a Local G drive to what was my Local D drive. Not sure what will happen if I try to boot from this.


#4

This is the correct behavior.

Take a closer look at your boot drive. There are at least two partitions on there, and those partitions could have drive letters. Windows intentionally removes the drive letter on the recovery partition, but on older builds that would actually show up as drive D.

So what’s going on here is that Windows sees the two partitions on the cloned target drive and is correctly assigning drive letters to both partitions. That doesn’t mean Macrium Reflect failed to work; in fact, it did exactly what it was supposed to, just as Windows did.

It’s just confusing because you aren’t expecting the extra drive letter, but it actually should show up like that the first time you plug a Windows 10 boot drive into a system. You can remove the drive letter from the recovery partition and re-assign the boot partition as D:, if you want, but there’s no need to actually do so, since you will presumably be disconnecting the drive and storing it in your safe.


#5

Thanks for explaining that to me. It makes a lot of sense now that you have explained it.