Monetizing a game


#1

Hi, need developers advice about app monetization. I have a few choises on how to monetize my game but need your advice. Just note that I do not want ads on it. So the first one is using sdks with no ads. I was thinking about globalhop ([link removed]) but not sure how effective is that cuz I didn’t find a lot of info on the net. The secon option is making some skins so people would buy them. But the question here is will people buy them? Nowadays there are a lot of free games so people might be skipping my app and downloading something else for free. What would you choose?


#2

#3

GlobalHop is dirty. Using a user’s network connection for other people’s data is absolutely unacceptable, and I would never install a program that did that, nor would I ever use a feature like this in software I write.

Cosmetic items are one way to make money from your app, as is simply charging a single price for your app.

As an end user, I dislike time-gating (aka: “buy coins to play more”), loot boxes, and other methods of incremental monetization. If I can’t just pay once and use a program forever, I will not install it.

Finally, I’m going to delist this post until you reply, since someone else reported this as possible spam. If you come back and want to talk more about what people think of video game monetization, I’m sure you’ll get some interesting input. =)


#4

i think the way tf2 and csgo do it is the best
or you could do what unturned did and have a support the dev dlc thing


#5

But how many people would like to pay for the app? That’s the main question for me. I don’t really believe that my app can get a lot of purchases. There are many concurrents with similar ones for free. Thats why I thought globalhop could be a good option for me. And unlike like you, I do not see it so shady. I agree that it could be unacceptable if you do not inform user about this kind of stuff and just add globalhop into the app without noticing user. But if you tell that to him/her and user accepts all the terms, thats not a problem for me. He knows he will became a gateway for getting this app for free and I will get payed for my work. I see this as a win win situation.


#6

Except no one reads the terms of service when installing an app, and people will just install and use it … and have no clue that their monthly data cap has been used up until it actually happens.

Then there’s the security issue… how do you know what this company is doing on the end user’s computer? Is it going through their files? Is it stealing their data?

And what, precisely, is the work this company is doing using your customers’ computers? The web site is pretty vague about that.

You may think you’re getting something for nothing, but really what you’re doing is selling out your users’ privacy, security, and Internet bandwidth.

And note the one thing that’s absent on their platform… iOS. You can’t install their software on the iPhone or iPad. Ask yourself why Apple would ban their service from the App Store if it’s a “win-win.”


#7

I see your point. I agree that many people don’t read the terms of service when installing an app but that’s completely their problem. From my, as an app developer perspective, I provide all the necessary information to my customers and they make the decision either use my product or not. I bet you’re buying a lot of gmo products at your local shop not because the owner of that shop doesn’t tell about that, but because you don’t read the label. And that’s your responsibility.
Talking about globalhop, this is the info that I found on their privacy policy https://globalhop.net/privacy-policy (you can remove the link again if you want, that’s just a prove I didin’t change it)
“By using applications with our SDK, you allow GlobalHop. to access your device and to use a small bit of your network connection and device’s resources. Your device resources are used when the device is idle and is on Wi-Fi connection (we may seldom use your cellular data, but very sparsely). Please note that our purpose for using your device resources is not to gather data about you, but to access and collect data from public internet resources, such as websites, e-shops, search engines, etc.”
It might sound pretty vague as you said, but for me it’s kinda obvious that they’re using this for marketing monitoring.
And btw, I see apple logo on their page and they caim to be working on macos, not sure why you say it can’t be installed on the iPhone or iPad


#8

MacOS is not iOS. Apple can’t stop any software from working on the Mac, because the Mac runs an open operating system (a modified version of Unix.) To stop GH SDK from working, they’d have to stop any non-approved application.

However, the kind of activity that GH does, using the user’s data for third party purposes, is specifically forbidden on the App Store, and note that iOS is not on the list of supported platforms on their sit.

Ask yourself this: why do they need to use other people’s computers and smartphones to do this? The aggregate of all their users’ bandwidth can’t be greater than their own, because that data still has to get sent back to GH. So there’s zero gain there. The only benefit to distributed downloads like this is to hide GH’s identity and location.

I can only think of a few reasons a company might need to use “a little bit” of CPU and bandwidth from devices all over the world - and none of those reasons are good. The only practical and ethical reasons to share bandwidth involve peer to peer activities that aren’t part of how this company describes their activities.

And that alone should be enough reason to not trust this company.

  • They don’t clearly explain what they’re doing
  • This activity works exactly like illegal and dangerous bot nets
  • There’s no obvious, legal and ethical purpose for the activity they describe
  • They’re willing to pay people for an activity that is not obviously legal or ethical

We do have dozens of examples of how this kind of network can be used for illegal or unethical purposes. Spam, denial of service, hacking, and piracy. All of those greatly benefit from exactly this kind of platform.

This company is hiding their true purpose, and when it comes to my computer, my Internet, and my reputation as a software developer - none of that is good enough. I’d want to know exactly what they are doing before putting my name on software that uses their service, I’d want to know exactly what they are doing before allowing their software to run on my computer. Vague promises just aren’t good enough.


#9

I would say pay up front or have skins personally
No loot boxes tho cause those are gambling


#10

Thank you for the disucussion and your experienced take on that. I personally fancy the idea, but surely it should be questioned. Might contact GH and check out on what they can provide in more particular way about where the gateways are being used.


#11

The two things i’d want to know before going into business with a system like that are:

  1. Exactly what does their system do?
  2. How much data does it actually use?

I’d also make absolutely sure that the user is giving informed consent when running an app that uses their framework. By that, i mean you specifically tell them that your application uses monetization features that use your CPU and networking for unrelated purposes, and you clearly get their consent before activating that feature.

Good luck, whichever way you go.