All-in-one NSA, Secret Cyber War and contra Tin Foil thread


#21

More News on the Topic From The Guardian Newspaper

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/17/edward-snowden-us-fair-trial?guni=Network


#22

Scott, that’s very true of the passed but they didn’t have the data back then, that they have today. When the NSA complex is completed, they will be able to collect enough data on every man, woman and child in the U.S. to know more about them, than they know about themselves. The only reason the government want a immigration bill passed, is so those people will come forward and they can collect their data. The government will know every aspect of your life, right down to the brand of bath soap you use and what time you use it.


#23

Whether or not either of these topics are serious is certainly a matter of personal opinion and any opinion is valid and should not be poo-pooed. Global warming is the biggest scam purported on the world ever! It certainly is not serious. Mentioning tinfoil in the title of this thread surely allows one to put in all the levity such inference allows.


#24

@xhi,

NO reason to be “hostile” to me personally. :((

I replied up in the Topic Thread that I would abide by the new non-serious rules on the New HTG Forum after the forum Administrator @Scott_vt admonished my earlier posting.

Everybody know ole Rick P. will try to observe Forum rules no matter what forum he’s posting on. :smiley:


#25

http://zapatopi.net/afdb/#WHAT


#26

Expanded ‘2-person rule’ could help plug NSA leaks …

Full Story:

Remark: This is similar to the old rules used in atomic missile launch silos.


#27

raphoenix, read your post. The NSA, FBI, DOJ officials telling Congress secret programs are vital to U.S. security. That might be some what true but what does collecting data on millions of U.S. citizens have to do with security, absolutely noting. They’re lying, when they say their not using the data. Why would they collect the data in the first place, if their not using it or going to use it. How bad do they want your data? Do you remember about four years ago, we had “cash for clunkers” and then free “cell phones”. Well, we traded in all those old clunkers for new cars and trucks, all with “GPS”. Then the government gives everyone, who can’t afford one, a new cell phone because they need their data also. What a deal!!!


#28

@ronniesonora

As you probably have noticed over the years, we AGREE on most everything.

In fact, you live pretty close to where I grew up. :smiley:


#29

They’ve always known the important things anyway. They know when I was born, where I live, what I earn and pay in taxes, when I cross the border or renew a license. They likely know my employer and my spousal status (and her info too). Millions of us have jobs that required fingerprinting.

If you think it bothers me how they can correlate data based on websites visited or clicks, it doesn’t. I think privacy was always a pipe dream, a fallacy, we never truly had it to begin with.

One step further, I trust the government with my data more than most corporations. If the fear is a quasi govt-corp entity like we’ve seen in some futuristic movies, (think Soylent Green), that’s scary and I believe a topic for a different discussion.

edit- our government, and by extension the police, have always had the ability to conduct searches and wiretaps by law with justifiable cause and due process. The blurring of the line of what needs a court order for surveillance is truly the only thing in the whole episode that has me angry.


#30

@Scott_vt

A Very Eloquent Defense of the Programs indeed by My Friend Scott.

However Everything has a beginning, longevity and an end.

Probably best to start an End to these Programs now before further erosion of personal privacy rights can be accomplished.

This ending should also be applied to private corporations as well as others bent on non-voluntary personal privacy intrusions.


#31

I love a ‘happy ending’
(even when it costs me an extra fifty)


#32

Many pertinent articles in a new New York Times series on Big Data:

www.bits.blogs.nytimes.com/category/big-data-2013/


#33

This:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/20/fisa-court-nsa-without-warrant


#34

Congress is not about to amend any of the laws under which these programs were created so may be just un-pin the topic and get use to way things are. In the future one could vote for different congress persons but that probably wouldn’t make any difference as the programs are bi-partisan and too entrenched after 10 years of growth. :((

ADDED:
The above doesn’t mean I agree with the programs, it’s just that I don’t think anything can be done now “after the horse as left the barn”.

ADDED:
British intelligence tapping fiber-optic cables for massive amounts of data…The GCHQ surveillance program is even bigger than NSAs, The Guardian says


#35

#36

@Scott_vt

Great article “For the Other Side of the Coin”. :smiley:

ALL Should Read !!!


#37

I used to have an account at Huffington Post before they borked the site by requiring facebook login and comments. Not even any other OpenID provider. ONLY FACEBOOK. A lot of people are leaving Huff as a result and going elsewhere. Not everyone is on social media or wants to bother with it, so maybe there is hope for humanity yet.


#38

The last reply to this topic is now over 198 days old


#39
First they came for the communists, and I didn't speak out, because I wasn't a communist. Then they came for the socialists, and I didn't speak out, because I wasn't a socialist. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn't speak out, because I wasn't a trade unionist. Then they came for me, and there was no one left to speak out for me.

—Martin Niemöller (1892-1984)


Anyone note the irony of the year in which he died?


#40